Its Queens, Winter 2010

Picking the most noteworthy politicians in Queens proved interesting for the staff.

Click on the image to view the magazine

Talk to old-timers and they will say that former times produced outstanding public servants. They cannot argue, however, that the Queens Borough President Donald Manes scandal, though it was quick and tragic, was most notable for its negative impact on politics.

Geraldine Ferraro is really the darling of Queens politics. Ferraro, who once had a small office on Grand Avenue in Maspeth, ascended in the political world to be a vice presidential candidate. She must surely be considered the trailblazer for women in politics in this country.

Tom Manton, who took over the reigns of the Queens County Democratic Organization following Manes’ suicide in 1986, led the charge to change the notion that politicians needed to be white and male. Manton had an uphill battle following the relentless media assault on Manes and Queens politicians. But in time, through his work with African Americans in South Queens and Hispanics and women throughout Queens, he truly strengthened the bond between the people and politicians here.

Corona just gained the distinction of being the zip code with the largest adolescent obesity rate, so we thought it the right time to rate burger joints in Astoria. Note BareBurger in Astoria. Ostrich, elk and bison burgers? Only in Queens.

Kirsten Gillibrand turns out to be more than just a pretty face after all.  Playing second fiddle to Chuck Schumer is no easy task, but when you read our cover story you’ll agree that she is carving out her own niche in Washington.

Queens fashion is a highly debated topic in New York. We at the staff here think it happens to be an important part of our culture. Be sure to check out our “Fashion Police” section.

Happy reading, and enhance your experience by scanning the barcodes throughout the magazine – they’re a lot of fun.

Walter (Walter Sanchez, Publisher)

Short URL: http://itsqueens.com/?p=206

Posted by on May 18 2011. Filed under Digital Editions. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Responses are currently closed, but you can trackback from your own site.

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